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Development of a new technology to help surgical removal of carcinomas in dogs

Assessment of the accuracy of a novel imaging system in distinguishing neoplastic from normal tissue during resection of carcinomas in dogs

IACUC Protocol #: G2017-80

Status: Recruiting

Species: Dog

Veterinary Speciality: Oncology, Soft Tissue Surgery

Description

In both human beings and dogs, local tumor recurrence following surgical removal of solid tumors is a major cause of treatment failure. An important technical limitation is that there is currently no widely available technique for rapid evaluation of the completeness of tumor removal during surgery. To address this need, a handheld imaging device has been developed that can be used in conjunction with injectable fluorescent imaging agents that accumulate in cancerous tissue and are administered to the patient prior to surgery. The imaging device can be used to scan the tumor bed for residual tissue to identify cancer that has not been removed. Removing this tissue has potential to reduce local recurrence rates. The objective of this project is to test the accuracy of the system in distinguishing normal tissue from cancerous tissue in dogs undergoing resection of carcinomas, a common category of cancer in dogs. We hypothesize that the system will have a high level of accuracy in this application.

Inclusion Criteria

Any dog with naturally occurring mammary, anal sac, liver, thyroid or lung carcinomas.  Informed client consent will be obtained prior to entering dogs in the study.

Exclusion Criteria

Patients with mammary tumors will be considered candidates for the study only if their tumors can be appropriately treated with a standard mass removal as opposed to unilateral or bilateral mastectomy.

Client Benefits

You will receive a $500.00 reduction in your total bill as an incentive to participate in this study, and you will not be charged for your initial office visit. Your pet’s participation will allow us to gain information that will help in the treatment of other dogs, cats, and humans undergoing surgical resection of malignant tumors.

Contact Info

For questions regarding the clinical trial please email the clinical trials technician, Diane Welsh at: clinicaltrials@tufts.edu

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